Trance is an important aspect in Angus MacLise’s sound works. The drummer, composer, poet and calligrapher was a link between Beat culture, New York City’s art scene in the Sixties, and the hippies. 78 minutes with material by an originator who never released a record during his short life.

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Wearing eyeball helmets is the trademark of the Californian artist collective The Residents. Inspired by avantgarde and pop, the band anticipated the idea of audio piracy and developed groundbreaking multimedia projects. 42-minute mix with some of the group’s conceptional thematic compositions and deconstructions of Western popular music.

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Most artists involved in what critics called no wave in 1978 shared a nihilistic mindset as they explored realms ranging from abrasive noise to mutant disco in New York City. 44-minute mix featuring tracks by Boris Policeband, Bush Tetras, Jill Kroesen, Konk and others.

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In conversation with music therapist Prof. Dr. phil. Isabelle Frohne-Hagemann I want to find out how receptive music therapy works and whether there are similarities between my own approach to listening and the established technique. Could guided listening to music possibly be an appropriate form of therapy for misophonia?

When composer Pauline Oliveros quoted Tibetan lama Sogyal Rinpoche on putting meditation in an equation with the wisdom of listening and the depth of insight in 1999, she had realized that her own listening skills were still continuing to evolve – forty six years after she started meditating on sound.

When sound became portable with the Walkman in the early Eighties, the subscription-only Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine begins to feature New York City’s expansive Downtown art scene on tape. 41-minute mix with Gretchen Bender, Jonathan Borofsky, Live Skull, Marjorie Van Halteren and others.

In the Eighties, old and new styles alike get developed in Jamaica. Ragga evolves and electronic production tools enter the studios, helping to establish the digital dancehall era. 37 minutes with Bunny Lie Lie, Charlie Chaplin, Don Carlos, Johnny Clarke and others.

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Traditional instruments and music – twisted by electronic musicians, composers, improvisers, and rockers. 56 minutes with The 13th Tribe, Don Cherry, Harry Hosono and the Yellow Magic Band, Sun City Girls and others.

Equally at home in the art world and the artists’ pub, Ata Tak‘s proprietors manage their label from a nice office in Düsseldorf; in the adjoining music studio, they pursue the idea of a world rebellion with sound – as Der Plan. 32 minutes with Holger Hiller, Minus Delta T, Picky Picnic, Wirtschaftswunder and others.

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During the 20th century, India attracted artists and musicians in pursuit of answers to spiritual needs or wanting to leave something behind. 56 minutes with Alice Coltrane, Coil with Lori Carson, Psycho Baba, Sun Ra and others.

An invented language, imitations of field-recordings, or the idea of a visual work with sound make these tracks express something not yet known. 38 minutes with Buffy Sainte-Marie, Gazelle Twin & NYX, Glynis Jones, Valentina Goncharova and others.

The stoic, almost machine like drumming of many West-German tunes from the early Seventies became the hallmark of a new sound – different from British pop or American rock, and in no way related to the country's horrible Nazi past. 45 minutes with Cluster, Faust, Harmonia 76, Wolfgang Riechmann and others.

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Yellow Magic Orchestra’s concept of connecting pop, dance music, and Far Eastern folklore quickly becomes synonymous with technopop in Japan. The band’s members also occur in each others solo recordings and cooperate with other musicians. 49 minutes with Apogee & Perigee, Friends Of Earth, Miharu Koshi, Ryuichi Sakamoto & The Kakutougi Session and others.

Fuelled by collaborations between producers, singers, and studio musicians in ever new constellations, the Seventies mark the transition from ska and rocksteady into a multitude of styles in Jamaica. 46 minutes with Keith Hudson, Norma White & Brentford Disco Set, Sound Dimension, Susan Cadogan and others.

Known for his innovative studio techniques, unique production style and weird tunes, Lee “Scratch” Perry combined influences from soul, funk, reggae, and dub in the early and mid Seventies. 46-minute mix with 14 tracks from the Perry orbit.

Aware of musical traditions and eager to incorporate the latest technology in his productions, Haruomi Hosono is one of the most versatile and influential figures in Japanese popular culture. 44 minutes with various collaborations and solo works by the co-founder of Yellow Magic Orchestra.

Free of artificial ornamentation, well balanced, and designed with love for detail, some Eighties’ Japanese ambient music resembles the concept of the countries’ traditional gardens. 51 minutes of music striving to enhance environments – with works by Haruomi Hosono, Inoyama Land, Masahiro Sugaya, Yasuaki Shimizu and others.

Re-configuring the past, drifting into a future, connecting different worlds, and shaping the profile of a fictitious ethnic group – 43 minutes with music by Bill Drummond, Dadang Dwi Septiyan, Jon Hassell, Malayeen and others – recorded between 1971 and 2020.

During the Seventies, musical traditions are being rediscovered in Japan. By blending them with their own preferences, artists create new sound worlds. 46 minutes with Akio Suzuki, Haruomi Hosono, Jun Togawa Unit, Toshi Ichiyanagi and others.

Owing to a straightness rooted in punk, new things and personalities get invented everywhere and all the time in West-Germany’s music scene of the Eighties. 53 minutes with Freiwillige Selbstkontrolle, Holger Hiller, Ingrid Wiener & Chor, Martin Kippenberger and others.

In the late Sixties, women composers start mixing various kinds of sonic material. Often their idea of intermedia art has a link to human life. 88 minutes with Christina Kubisch, Eliane Radigue, Frankie Mann, Ruth Anderson and others.

Forming a loose community of interdisciplinary collaborators, Fluxus artists are rethinking the role of art in society during the Sixties. 47 minutes with Carolee Schneemann, Henning Christiansen, Terry Riley, Yoko Ono and others.

The electrification of music during the 1950s led to a multitude of artistic concepts. 50 minutes of fieldwork and funny sounds with Alireza Mashayekhi, Delia Derbyshire, Else Marie Pade, İlhan Mimaroğlu and others.

Synthesizers brought new sounds into the world. 43 minutes of oscillators, filters and envelopes controlled by Conrad Schnitzler, Daphne Oram, Erkki Kurenniemi, Laurie Spiegel and others – between the early Sixties and 1977 (plus an exception).

Snapshots on national pride, cars, country music, and human abysses behind proper facades – 51 minutes with Amiri Baraka, Ann Magnuson, Henry Rollins, Madeline Ridley and others.

Artists see things differently. 45 minutes with sound works by Carole Caroompas, Dieter Roth, Jess Holzworth and Jutta Koether, Magazzini Criminali and others.

Whether conceptual or performance art, electronic music, counterculture, minimalism, drone sounds, or Fluxus – New York City is a hotbed for all sorts of experiments during the Sixties. 62 minutes with Angus MacLise, Henry Flynt, La Monte Young & Marian Zazeela, Richard Maxfield and others.